How to be Prepared for Birth: Tips from a Nurse Episode 004

I’m Eva ZobianWolf. I’ve been a Nurse for 17 years, 10 in ICU. I’m also a Holistic Health Coach, Reiki Master, Brain Health Certified Coach, and Yoga Therapist. I work with Nurses to reduce the effects of stress, exhaustion, and burnout. I have courses, and online programs, and work with clients privately.

You can find Eva here:

IG and FB @EvaZeeWellness

www.evazeewellness.com

Join the waitlist for my next Boost Your Milk Supply Bootcamp:

https://www.boostyourmilksupply.com/challenge

Read all about breastfeeding here:

https://EarlyMotherhoodGuide.com

Lacy Reason  

Welcome to the early motherhood guide podcast. Are you a new mom feeling overwhelmed and don’t know where to start? And this podcast is for you. Hey, mamas. I’m Lacy reason here for your breastfeeding season. If you’re like most moms, the transition into motherhood can be a little overwhelming. In this podcast, I will give you tools and advice as a lactation counselor, as well as interview experts to help make early motherhood a little less daunting. So sit back, relax, grab a cup of coffee, and let me help guide you through these early days of motherhood. I am Lacy, your lactation counselor, and you guys are listening to the early motherhood guide podcast. So today, I have the opportunity to speak with Eva, why don’t you introduce yourself?

Eva  

So my name is Eva, I am the founder of EVA Z wellness. I am a nurse who is now a mind body specialist. I’m a nurse as well as a yoga therapist. I’ve been a nurse for about 17 years. And 10 of those years, I was an ICU nurse and also charge nurse while I was ICU nurse. So that meant that I responded to a lot of different events throughout the hospital.

Lacy Reason  

That sounds incredibly giving and stressful. But we appreciate it. So then let’s go right into so mothers and births. So I have had one hospital birth. And I think it can be incredibly hard speaking your wishes when you’re in the middle of labor, right. And so we all have this birth plan. And I like to express them as wishes, because things don’t always go as planned. So I’d love to know, how can we as mothers and labor, do a better job of vocalizing our birth wishes.

Eva  

One is remembering that your safety as well as baby safety is always that is at the forefront of what everybody is focused on. But also having that relationship with your OB Gen and your nurses that you’re letting them know exactly what it is that you’re envisioning. But with that, having a little bit of that flexibility to let, if life happens, then it’s everybody’s focused on safety and having the best relationship. But I think a lot of that has to do with choosing the right environment. I mean, sometimes we can’t, we can’t control the circumstances, but we can express our views and being kind and compassionate, to the medicals to the medical staff, also for them to is having them be a little more kind and compassionate with the stress of the events. And with that, that’s just in being very, very clear and communicating exactly what it is that you’re hoping the event looks like and feels like. You know, letting them know that there’s, there’s there’s that give and take everybody’s part of the situation. And that just there’s only one way this is going to happen.

Lacy Reason  

And it’s so funny with my first and you know, having a hospital, I envisioned this, like beautiful. I wanted to do Hypno birthing. And so I had my Hypno birthing tracks going and of course your first it’s intense, right, and I’m in the middle of a contraction as a nurse comes in. And I just just completely cussed like in the middle of a contraction. And she’s like, she hears the track and she’s like, Oh, you’re hypnobirthing and my husband just thought it was hilarious, you know, because I have these like, big candles lit and everything tried to set this mood and it was so funny because it was like at that point I was like none of this is working like I’m not No it’s funny how you have like this idea of how you want it to go and yet that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s gonna go that way right? Whether that’s internal or external factors, like you know, there’s always so many things but but your first it can be pretty intense if you’re ready for it, but I love having a birth plan, but also like being aware of like, what to ask for right? So is there anything that is like absolute like you as a nurse You would always want to know, is there something like very specific that she you like look for in a birth plan? If they have written it to? Do you know what I mean? Yes.

Eva  

And some of the things are, you know, being as vocal and upfront as you can about everything, you know, if there’s any allergies, if there’s any, any particular methods of soothing that you’ve been that you’ve been using anything that isn’t really important to you just being clear that these are the these are the things that work well for me, and how can we bring that bring this into the environment and in a safe way? So if there’s music that you like to play, or if there’s, you know, yeah, essential oils, just being mindful that if they, if that medical person isn’t educated on those particular things, then just offering, you know, Hey, are you aware of how helpful this is? And would you mind being part of this? And usually, usually, everybody’s just, absolutely, let’s, let’s, let’s try it, let’s see what works. And in the end, you know, this is this is you your experience, and it should, you know, theoretically, it should go exactly the way that you would like it to, but we know, there’s some situations that we just don’t have control over. And when that happens, having that grace and compassion and kindness, not just for everybody around you, but for yourself. Yeah.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah. And that thing is like, obviously, the nurses are there to support you, and everybody wants a nice, healthy baby in the end, you know, but being able to communicate like, this is the way I would like, the experience to go, I think, is extremely crucial of setting up those expectations for everyone, right. So, with that, how do you relaxing during birth? Right? So you have experience in both on being mindful and in nursing? But how would you recommend to help being more mindful and relaxing your breathing just just being more relaxed during birth? Because that obviously helps tremendously. Having labor progress?

Eva  

Yes, absolutely. And the last recommendation that I would have, would be to start practicing that now. Don’t wait until the labor process has started. But instead, bringing these components into into your life now. And it can be simply something as simple as just breathing and focusing more on the exhale, when we exhale, it’s a signal to our body for the muscles to soften and relax. And a lot of times, when we’re anxious, keyed up in pain, we have a tendency to hold really tight and we hold our breath. And that’s the opposite of we’re what we’re wanting to do, because we’re wanting to let go and we’re wanting the process to be more relaxed. So having that that practice already there. And then again, having these habits of things that you do in your daily life, that you know, work for you. So if there’s a particular type of music that you listen to that’s really calming for you have that there. There’s specific items like a blanket or a pillow, or something that just instantly brings relaxation to you have that there with you. Whatever the different things that you do in your daily life that can help you with relaxation. If you’re practicing them regularly, then when you get to that situation, you’re going to have that muscle memory that will even though your mind and you may be racing and you’re thinking oh my God, how can I possibly relax during this situation because you know, I’ve got a watermelon coming out the the space that doesn’t normally fit a watermelon. that muscle memory can kind of help bring you back into that into that mode of relaxation where you’re using the physiology of the body to work on calming the body, but it will also in turn work on on the mind as well.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, I was there’s something about breathing and like doing that slower breath that actually physically does something to your body of slowing everything down, which is pretty cool. It is challenging. And yes, I would actually recommend practicing beforehand, you know, with my first I did practice quite a bit, and then in practice less than less with my last two, but that doesn’t mean I, I should, I should with every birth practice more and more. And being more minor or being more prepared, I think is a key, right. And so when you’re at the hospital, so I try to always show my appreciation to the nurses, or the midwife. How, like I the last time it was I was so busy, but I did bring like Oreo cookies, right? Or something just anything for them to snack on. But how would you recommend to show their appreciation? So like, sometimes I’ll write cards depending on how busy in life I am. But is there something that nurses just always appreciated more than others?

Eva  

Oh my gosh, there are so many different ways to show appreciation to nurses and one of the biggest things is just simply Thank you. It’s, um, you know, having worked as an ICU nurse for so long, and I’ve been in the hospital system for for 20 years. I’ve gotten a lot of weird comments and thank yous are always always appreciated. But also things like little little baskets of granola bars, chocolates. Yeah. Honestly, anything that can be picked up and eaten. is always appreciated. There’s, there’s just little things have lots of meaning. Just that that sense of appreciation is is always that part goes a long way.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah. My my first birth, my sweet mother went to like Nora shrimps and got like, these decadent cookies from like, their cafe and gave them to the nurses after which was so sweet. And then of course by my third I’m like, here’s some Oreos. So, so work on that.

Eva  

And you know, it’s there’s no gift that’s too small. That it’s the sentiment behind it. That is incredibly appreciated.

Lacy Reason  

Okay, good. So, yeah, it’s good to be prepared and have something that is not needed to be refrigerated. And then a little thank you note is always I always like to do so.

Eva  

Yeah. Anything that can be picked up and you can walk away and still be eating it. Those are golden.

Lacy Reason  

Good to know. Yeah. Because sometimes you don’t you’re not the nicest when you’re in labor. And in my physical words aren’t kind at least my chocolate is.

Eva  

Oh, yeah. So I’ve got some I’ve got some really colorful descriptions of things that people have had said to me and different at different times in their, their illness cycle. And the thing is, we always understand that when somebody is not well, especially in birth what you’re saying is not the person that you are

Lacy Reason  

right. To have some really thick skin I’m sure.

Eva  

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. That’s that’s you know, you just understand that that that’s not who that person is at that moment. Yeah, that’s anger leaving the body that’s you know, pain waiting the body.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, very true. I, with my first it was really intense. And I was transitioning, and I remember the nurse being like, she’s only a six like, and I wanted to kill this lady like you because I was literally going from a six to a 10 in minutes. Like it was the most intense minutes of my life and for her to just be like, Oh, she’s there like you got a long way to go and I’m going to kill all of you and this baby’s gonna fall out. So it worked out and yes, I tried to do all of what I said but I’m very interesting experience. So I’m with that how can we be better prepared for a hospital birth?

Eva  

Having the things that are important to you Having having that having those items already prepared, taking a tour of the hospital Most places will offer a tour either virtually or in person. And making that making that a priority. So that you already have a an idea of what the space is going to look like for you, you have ideas of things that you can bring snacks for Dad, because you know, the staff will bring all kinds of snacks for mom, but they don’t necessarily always have stuff there for Dad, you know, pillows, blankets, different things that are going to make you feel cozy and comfortable and make you feel safe and secure. Those items are really important. And then just having that grace and compassion for yourself that if again, you know, if things don’t go 100% The way you’re expecting them to. And for moms that have never had a baby, I think that happens a little bit more. Because by the time you have baby number two, you kind of understand them through the whole process or the understanding that every birth is completely different. Whether it’s your first birth or your fifth birth, every birth is very different. It’s a unique experience. And being being in that experience, be mindful in that experience to take the time to be kind be kind to yourself, be kind to your partner, and just that communication between yourself and the nursing staff as well, too.

Lacy Reason  

There’s so much there like the be prepared for your husband, right? So or your partner, whoever is there to be there for you. No one thinks about that person. They’re in it just as long as you are right. That is huge. And something that usually they have at the birth center, they have you bring a meal for yourself afterwards as well. And you can’t leave until you have that meal. And so same for the poor husband, right? Like, I should have a meal there for him because he’s probably starving just as much. And then to be prepared and like going through the hospital and knowing where you’re going to be dropped off and where you’re going to get checked in, then where are the rooms are and like what room could you possibly so you can start visualizing, how do I want this birth to go? Right? Because it’s so much easier to visualize the birth, if you at least have a room to focus on, right? There’s not so many unknowns. You’ve seen the faces of the nurses, you’ve had a tour of the hospital, you know, I mean, it’s the weirdest thing when your husband drops you off. And you’re like, alone? Where do I go now? You know, while they go park the car and you’re like, and they don’t even want to like I’m not supposed to leave you. Right? It’s, it’s, it’s good to have that walkthrough. Right.

Eva  

And then from both Yeah, both for yourself and for your partner because they’re trying to be supportive, but they’re also in their own sense of unknown and, you know, having that the more things that you can learn and understand prior to will help you feel more secure and more safe. And yeah, hopefully make the experience. I mean, the experience should be amazing, beautiful. It’s such a phenomenal experience. Even you know, regardless of weight, the process of it, you know, for some for some, it’s not a magical experience. And I say that now, you know, my, my, my birth with my son was 30 years ago. So there’s that time in there where I do remember, I was not thinking it was a magical experience at the time that I was happening at that I was just like, give me all the meds now. And so, you know, when I walked in, I had every intention of Oh no, no beds, I’ll be fine. It’ll be good. I’ll be okay. And then once once we got into the transition phase, I was just like, No, no, I lied.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, and I think that and also being prepared for your expectations and giving yourself grace because when the first if you haven’t if you have the idea and the desire to go natural, giving yourself Grace and I gave myself limits in So I was like, I’m okay, if I decide to have an epidural, if this happens. And so for me it was if I ended up meeting Pitocin, I don’t think I could naturally handle that. And if I go more than 24 hours, funny thing, now I’ve gone through three, Labor’s No way can I make it 24 hours naturally, there’s just no way. So that was, but that was my plan to give myself Grace already, I was prepared to be okay, with not hitting my goal of going to natural birth, if things didn’t go as planned, and I was very grateful that those things didn’t go as planned. And so in the end, I was just so excited. I was ecstatic, you know, on the birth I but it is important because things really don’t go as planned. And so it is not the end of the world, if you decide to have an epidural. You know, I see a lot of moms, when they do get that epidural, all of a sudden, they’re able to transition right after that, right? Because they’re now able to relax, where if you’re like holding on for dear life, like fighting it, and you’re just been at a certain, like diameter, or whatever, was it centimeter centimeters, if you have been at that, and you’re not making any progress, and just having an epidural will allow you in your body to progress. That’s amazing, you know, and it is so good to be prepared on whatever route but to give yourself grace, because there’s a lot of unknowns, right. So that is,

Eva  

yeah, yeah. And that’s just that there’s so many unknowns and being able to be kind, yeah, give yourself grace, be kind to yourself be understanding of the fact that, you know, the experience itself, is in terms of what your body is going through. It’s, it’s a lot to pry, it’s a lot to go through. And the more that you can be kind to yourself, and it’s okay to take assistance when needed. And then, you know, when you look back on it still, you know, yeah, we always have this idea of what we would like it to look like, and being able to look back on it, and just, you know, say, it would have been great. had it gone the way I had wanted to, but it didn’t. So now how do we how do I move forward, there may be that time period in between where you need to, you know, process, whether it’s with your therapist, or you know, you know, however how whoever, whatever mental health professional or, you know, how your best friend, however, that happens, you know, process that and let letting go of that so that you can enjoy the time. Your time with baby. Yeah.

Lacy Reason  

And there is such a like, there can be a grievance process, right with your birth, if it doesn’t go according to plan very easily, and it can be traumatizing you like at the end of my first I really felt like, kind of feel traumatized. You know, and it is, it’s a thing to process, you know, even though things went so well. It is still an intense experience. It’s unlike anything else. And it’s transformed. Transformational. Right. So to give yourself grace, and then that time to process it, whether you are talking to someone professionally, or friends, which is why I love watching birth stories. I think that is therapeutic in itself. Right?

Eva  

Yes, absolutely. And that community aspect helps you to know that. It’s not just you, you’re not the only one that had that went through a process that look different than what you anticipated, or you know that you have a certain level of expectation and that was met. And just like you said, there there may need to be a grieving process for that. But then how do you how do you move forward with how where you are with with baby and to be able to enjoy that experience? All of that is just giving yourself that grace? So that compassion,

Lacy Reason  

yeah, so there’s so many ways, you could do a whole episode on just being prepared in birth in so many different aspects, right. And so here’s one that I really wanted. So I gave birth to my last baby just before COVID started, which I’m extremely grateful for. But if someone has birth before COVID, and now they’re going to give birth again after Is there any expectations that they should have? Is it going to be different in any way moving forward? That could be different than it was before? Because we’re the world This change?

Eva  

Absolutely. And it just depends on where what facility you’re going to because a lot of different facilities, we’re all still in this process of, we’ve never experienced this before. So, you know, we’re still on the end of a pandemic, we’re coming out of it. And there’s some times where hospitals have to become tighter in their restrictions and times when they can be more open. And it’s just, again, it’s that level of communication, asking questions, what are the things that we can do? What are the things that we can’t do? You know, visitors are not being restricted, in most places any longer. But there are still areas where they’re asking, or asking for COVID tests, they’re asking for different things. And it’s just being mindful of that. And, you know, what’s the current state and the environment in the area where you are? Because, depending on case loads, that may not affect directly the area where you’re giving birth, but it is going to affect the staffing of the hospital, in terms of what are the things that are available? And again, this is, this is just an unprecedented time and having that grace and compassion for yourself, but also for the staff, because a lot of the medical field right now is just exhausted. Yeah, they’re they’re being they’re being stretched in a lot of different ways. And, you know, for some folks, they’re able to handle well, and for others, they’re healing too.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, that’s true. And so are you thinking? Would you expect less staff on like, a more locked down time? Was that the more longer wait time? If you’re like, needing some assistance?

Eva  

It all depends on the area of where you are. Because there there are areas with there are areas with staffing issues, depending on what the capacity of the hospital is, and how many, how many, how many patients what the what the census is of the hospital at that time, if they’re, if they have a lot of units that are at full capacity, that makes staffing an issue and staffing is always an issue. That’s something that hasn’t changed a decades of medicine. So that’s always a concern. And typically, we’re able to navigate that well, and some places do better than others. So this is where having more information about the area where you live in the area where you’re going to be using facilities is really important.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, and it’s, it’s interesting because it can be so different, right? So I, where I live, it’s definitely been more stricter lockdowns. And this somebody that I interviewed last time was, they gave birth on the day the lockdown started in COVID, which like, what an experience, but she had a home birth. So it didn’t really they’re like, Oh, isn’t this interesting? And it didn’t really affect who was there yet? Because she said it was great, because it was so new. No one really knew how to implement it. Yeah, it was really interesting. But yeah, you really have no idea. And so it’s, I think, another reason to be more prepared and asking those questions. Were you planning to give birth? Because there are a lot of unknowns and things change in the future so rapidly now? So yeah, I think it could be huge difference than it was before. You know, I was so grateful that I was able to have a doula and a birth photographer and my husband, which flew out of the country for the birth. And if that was a few months later, it that would not have happened, you know. So hopefully moving forward, though, I believe, Oh, and she also had a doula business. And so you imagine, like, are you going to be able to have a doula there? That is something I do believe they’re allowing those now. Right. That’s good.

Eva  

Yeah. And a lot of hospitals are incorporating doulas more and because we’ve had these situations with COVID. I think some places are becoming a little more receptive to multiple roles within the birthing process. And I would love to see this happening more in in healthcare where we’re expanding the options that are available to people and and having having lots of different environments and scenarios, because birth, home births are just an absolutely fantastic experience. They are just amazing. I was able to assist a dear friend of mine and her home birth, not as a nurse just purely as a as a support person. And she had a midwife and a doula there, and they were amazing. And for some people, that is, that’s exactly what they want. And other people are just like, nope, forgot to give me the Pitocin and epidural, and I’m good to go. And that’s the thing is, everybody’s experience could be as close as to what it is that they’re wanting. And, you know, how do we how do we provide that environment that supports everybody?

Lacy Reason  

Yeah. For sure, and like, some people are just gonna want more support, just in case, right. So with my first there was a lot of meconium in the amniotic fluid. And so they were able to have that stuff come right down when needed, which was great. But if you want a more intimate birth, where it’s like, I just want my midwife, maybe a doula. And that is it. That is, you know, a different option. There’s so many options. And so if you’re wanting more, yeah, I love the option, post COVID homebirths, I think are awesome, if that is your desire, you know. So, you were saying that you had some experience in the neonatal care, what is to be expected, I have been very fortunate to not have that experience. But what would a mama expect in that in the case that they had to go to neonatal

Eva  

and every Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is different. And when I worked in the, in the NICU, I was working there as a phlebotomist, and not as a nurse. But it was, it was such a phenomenal environment to work at. And I absolutely loved my time there. neonatal nurses are a very special breed, because they become, they become part of the family, they become that extension of the family that they are very protective of those children. And they, they go to bat for them, right from the get go. And so there are a lot more restrictions in terms of who can go into the unit. You know, if you even potentially feel like you may have the sniffles, or the sneezes or anything along those lines, being vocal and just saying, hey, you know, this is what’s going on? And you know, what can how can I? How can I go in and be safe for myself, as well as all of the children that are in that in that space. And just being understanding that everything that they are doing is so that that baby gets everything that they need to be able to grow up? safe and strong.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, I never thought about that with the illness. Because after you give birth, you’re sleep deprived, you’ve gone through so much your immune system is down. So the odds of getting sick, you know, are high, I can always see you stick around like six weeks is when mom was always get sick, you know, it’s around the six week mark, or always, because they’re just so tired. And obviously, yeah, communicating that with the staff beforehand. Does that mean that they would have to come? Would they have to space out their visit? Or is that mean that they’re gonna have to pump to bring over breast milk? Or are they having to, like stay away until they’re better? How would that experience go?

Eva  

All depends on what the illness is what, what’s going on. And just, the more you communicate with them and let them know, the more the more they can offer, like just like you were saying they can offer lots of different options in terms of because the other thing too, is maybe what mom needs at that moment. Is that time to rest and recover because she has been through so much stress and so much physical upheaval as well, too. But, you know, having having somebody there with baby to watch, while while she gets in a couple of hours of a nap or whatever the situation is, the more communication that happens, the better. Yeah,

Lacy Reason  

yeah, I have a client that had three of her babies in the NICU for an extended period of time. And their fourth they were able to take home right after the hospital and she said was an entirely different experience. The one thing was her other babies were on like A great schedule. And because we add the NICU, they have these, like you’re honest, a great routine. And then her fourth was, like, just oh, she was like a new mom all of a sudden, which is funny. It’s like an entirely different experience, which is fun to be a part of.

Eva  

Yeah, it’s, that was such a phenomenal experience. And just the amount of time that the nurses span that all of the staff spend with the babies. They’re just, they become, they become really, really, you know, you know, whether they whether they become part of the, the lifelong extension of the family or not, they’re always those memories are always there. And there’s always a lot of emotion that’s involved with that.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, I can’t imagine like being there for some of them are there for quite an extended period of time. And then, do anybody ever do they ever come back to visit and do like, give them updates or cards?

Eva  

Yes. And several of the nurses that I worked with, they stayed in contact with, with the parents for a long time. And I believe that there was even, there were little reunions that they have periodically as well, too. And so yeah, I gotta tell you, as a nurse, being able to have somebody come back or write a card, and just say, because this was, you know, even as an ICU nurse, there’s a lot of times where we didn’t know what happened, what the person did they they transferred out of the ICU. Did they? Did they do well? Did they not do? Well? What you know, did they a lot of times it was because they didn’t even remember, but somebody came back and was just like, hey, guess what, you know, I’m all better now. And those moments were just absolutely amazing. I still every card that somebody gave me, I still have all of those because they just they meant so much to me.

Lacy Reason  

What a good idea. Yeah, that’s a great tip. Skill update. I’m sure that’d be very rewarding.

Eva  

Oh, yeah, absolutely. I mean, those happy memories carry you a lot.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, I bet. Very needed. Okay, so I believe you have a course in a great boot camp where a challenge, right for a little bit more of self care. Can you tell me a bit more about it?

Eva  

Yeah, so I have been combining all of the different experience and the different trainings that I’ve that I’ve utilized to help nurses specifically. But really anybody that has a lot of stress in their life, to be able to use the things that they have in their own life, to create self care rituals that can help them either manage or prevent burnout, because exhaustion and stress, leave an imprint on us. And it’s not just a mental component, but it’s also a physical relationship. So this as you were talking about how when moms get sick, usually around week six, that’s usually about the time when their energy reserves are completely depleted. And exhaustion and the stress have caught up with them. And that’s the reason that they’re getting sick is because they’re, they’re depleted. Yeah. So anything that you can do, to bring that back into your life and bring your body back towards balance, will help you to stay healthy, and to be more kind and compassionate, not just to yourself, but also to those around you as well. And I have a course that I’m utilizing, and working with nurses and anybody with high stress, to find ways to look specifically at their life and learn what it is that they need for themselves to get that mind body integration. And so that will be happening in the class is a free event. And that’s happening January 9 through the 11th. And if anybody’s interested, they can just message and I will send them the link to opt in for that.

Lacy Reason  

Yeah, what an amazing tool to have, you know, because it is such a trying time and you’re constantly giving everything to everyone else. And even if your partner like how are you going usually if you are depleted, typically take it out on your partner or anyone around you, right? And so to have these tools to take care of yourself already instilled and not be touched out or just exhausted and just be able to enjoy those early days of motherhood would be very valuable, I think

Eva  

Absolutely, and a lot of the difficult times can be made so much easier when we give ourselves that kindness and compassion, to accept help, to not feel that we have to do everything 100% on our own, but to be able to it sounds so silly, but just to be able to say, the dishes can sit in the sink, the clothes can sit in the, in the on the washer for a day. And instead, how can we have a meaning with the moments that are that are happening right now? And to do so with, with all of that joy that comes from that, you know, even even when you’re sitting in that, that time period where you know, baby has pooped through all of the clothes and diapers? And how can you take that moment and just go, this is going to be something that, you know, we’re gonna laugh at years from now. But how can we how can we find the joy in this moment, even though we’re to our elbows and whatever, whatever baby has projected out,

Lacy Reason  

right? I think I take that advice too well, because my laundry is always writing to be like, Yeah, I’ll fold it will be folded eventually, right? Yes, yes. Okay, great. Well, thank you so much for coming today and talking with me and preparing our mamas more for birth and taking care of their bodies and their nurses, which obviously, so needed. And thank you, everyone for watching and listening. I will see you guys all next week on the early motherhood guide podcast. Thanks, guys.

Thank you so much lacy for all you do.

Lacy Reason  

Oh, thank you so much. All right. I will see you guys later. I think. Thank you for joining us on the early motherhood guide podcast. Be sure to subscribe. And if you haven’t already, click the link below to join my booster mock supply bootcamp. See you next week.